Foot Problems and Feet Treatments for Nurses

Whoever had the feeling that being a nurse is not a difficult job couldn’t be more wrong. Nurses are confronted with other people’s health problems but they often experience their own. Foot problems are the most common because they tend to stand for a very long time and they have a chaotic schedule. Luckily, there are treatments for each issue so that they can keep on doing a great job for others.

Problem:

Feet soreness

The most common problem of nurses is the intense pain they are likely to feel on their feet after spending an entire day standing. This is due to all the pressure on the feet and the improper blood circulation that prevents blood from reaching the extremities. Given all the weight that presses on the feet, the ankles and the heels start to feel achy and to cause discomfort when standing.

Solution:

Whenever their feet hurt, nurses should sit down for a moment and stretch their legs to allow the muscles to relax. Therapy must be performed at home and physical exercise is mandatory for staying in shape and even losing some weight to minimize the tension and pressure on their bones and joints.

Problem:

Swollen feet

Improper blood circulation and water retention cause feet to swell after standing or sitting the entire day. Nurses often experience this problem especially if they have a few extra pounds. Although not a serious health concern, it could get problematic if it persists for many days even after repose.

Solution:

A good massage can do wonders for swollen feet to have blood circulating properly to the extremities. A soothing warm bath can also dilate the blood vessels and relax their feet. However, if the problem doesn’t go away in a few days, the help of a doctor is required for further investigations that could detect more serious diseases.

Problem:

Blisters and bunions

Nurses often experience blisters caused by wearing shoes the entire day, no matter if their feet get swollen or they stand too much. They appear when the skin is rubbed against the interior or the edges of footwear. Bunions are a more serious concern related to the bones of the toe. When wearing tight shoes, the bone becomes more prominent and causes the foot to change shape and become much wider.

Solution:

Tight and small footwear is the main cause of blisters and bunions so the first thing that must be done is to replace improper shoes with wider and more comfortable ones. Bunions are severe feet problems that lead to a deformity of the toe’s bones and they are extremely painful. With the help of the best shoes for nurses that provide comfort and allow your feet to stretch, you can control them and prevent them from getting worse.

Problem:

Corns and calluses

A busy schedule and a lot of standing cause the feet to rub against the shoes and cause the so-called corns and calluses that are actually layers of dead and thickened skin. They are not only uncomfortable but also very unpleasant to see.

Solution:

These layers of dead skin shouldn’t be removed with any sharp object because this can lead to infections and injuries. Instead, ask for the help of a podiatrist to have it removed in a hygienic and safe manner.

Problem:

Ingrown nails

A toenail that digs painfully into the skin can be caused by tight shoes, injuries, or fungus infections. It’s commonly seen in nurses who spend many hours a day wearing the same pair of shoes that can often get too tight. Bad nail trimming can aggravate the problem and make the ingrown nail look worse and feel more painful.

Solution:

A good pedicure is always in demand especially for nurses who stand a lot and usually wear the same pair of shoes. Toenails should never be trimmed in depth because this opens the path for bacteria and fungus infections. Always cut them straight across and keep them longer at the ends. The shoes are also important so make sure the ones you wear at work are wide and comfortable.

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